Printing and Purchasing

Posts tagged ‘Printing Schools’

Design

Today everyone can be a designer. No longer do you need to go to design school and purchase expensive equipment. Today you can purchase software for your personal computer. Whether using Word, PageMaker, InDesign, Publisher or one of the other software options, everyone can design their own forms or brochures.

I reviewed one of these brochures the other day, and the design principles I learned from Rochester Institute of Technology [RIT] School of Printing came to mind. Design should be prepared in a way that allows readers to receive the message of the author or the purpose of the advertisement. The design should create an atmosphere that enhances the message, not distract the reader nor should it dominate the message.

There are many ways to distract the reader from the message. Images are used many times in a design, for good reason. We all have read the quote by Napoleon Bonaparte “A picture is worth a thousand words“. When images are sized, however, some designers distort their images to make them fit the design. I believe this shouldn’t be done, for example, if an image is the correct height but not the width. When a designer elongates the image to fit the space, people in the image will look short and exceptionally fat. This distortion will distract the reader from the author’s message. Whether reading a book or sales flyer the design/images are to support the author’s message not distract from it.

Layouts a Key Element in a Job Bag

Have you ever been on a trip and got lost? If you have, maybe it’s because there was no trip ticket, map or Garmin showing which roads and exits to take. With a printing project there also must be directions to layout, print, and finish the printing project. This direction is provided via the job layout [map]. For every printed component included in the Job Bag there is a layout for each component. Each layout can have one or multiple components.

Layouts have many components. The following are several main or key components:

  • Substrate size
  • Press
  • Gripper
  • Side guide
  • Bleed
  • Gaps
  • Reverse images
  • Take-off bars
  • Folds
  • Grain direction
  • How the sheet is backed up
  • Form number[s]
  • Head direction
  • Items keyed to job bag listing
  • Job number
  • Customer
  • Other

The information provided on the layout should provide production workers with all the necessary information to produce each component of the customer’s project successfully. Calls or questions concerning a form are usually the result of incomplete or inaccurate instructions.

Within the last year, I was in a print shop and they had printed a poster. I didn’t review the layout. However, it was clearly apparent that there was no layout for the project. How can pre-press accept a project without a layout? Without a layout how will the Mac operator know if the image files provide adequate image for bleeds? How will imposition know where and in what direction to place the images in the plate file, or If there are images missing or where to place the crop marks? How will quality assurance verify a press rule-up if there is no layout? The odds are there is no quality assurance in this print shop, or knowledgeable print professionals!

If the layout isn’t complete it is up to the pre-press manager to stop the job or be provided a correct layout. If the pre-press manager is allowing incorrect or incomplete layouts to enter into production, corrective action should be taken. The old adage is true, “you can pay me now or pay me later” [YouTube video Link http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=aq3wL8ZXjBU] and later is always more expensive.

Print buyers, when touring a printing company, should look for a project’s corresponding layout. If you have a project being worked on, ask to see a job bag, and then review it for completeness and accuracy of information. As a print buyer, if at all possible, provide all the information concerning the project when the print order is placed with the print sales representative. During my years in printing, one of the best ways to minimize cost was to insure the layout answered all questions which will minimize added work or extra steps for production.

Springfield Mayor Domenic Sarno – Part 2

Graphics or Printing is one of my passions. During my career I have been fortunate to have years of education [BS] and a career of diverse positions in the printing industry. One of the major influencers of this passion was the teachers at Roger L. Putnam Vocational Technical High School’s Print Shop. Mr. Chapman, Mr. Clune and Mr. Dodd were influential in my vocation, and secondary education. These teachers cared about printing and their students.

The print shop was important to the city since it supplied the printing needs of the school department as well as the city of Springfield. Work was abundant in the shop and it allowed students to learn the trade in a hands on practical way. The teachers knew the trade. The teachers had diverse backgrounds from being experienced in the industry to being an RIT graduate, which happens to be my alma mater.

This was a great educational experience. The press room was always busy with as many as 7 presses/duplicators running at any given time thus giving the students practical experience. The shop had several hand-fed clam shells, a Heidelberg Windmill, Miele Vertical, AB Dick 350, 360, Multi-Graphics, and a Heidelberg Korg. The press room was run by Mr. Dodd who also worked as a pressman after hours which allowed him to stay current.

A student was able to utilize co-op in their junior year and students who excelled were able to work summers printing the school handbook for the coming year. Some may say most of this is repetitive work, however, when training repetition is important.

Last month I walked into the Graphics Department and I was very pleased. I walked into the pressroom and my senses came alive with the unique smells you experience in an active working pressroom. I experienced students cutting paper, running a large folder [click hyperlink to see video http://youtu.be/Ts_WgflXZRo ], not a desk top, manning the customer service counter and preparing files to print. When talking with the teachers I was aware they loved and knew printing [click hyperlink to see video http://youtu.be/V7SIYiDd484 ]. Seeing the department’s awards wall [click hyperlink to see video http://youtu.be/hFygvg7oer8 ] I was doubly aware the teachers were sharing this knowledge with the students. Unfortunately I wasn’t in Putnam, Springfield’s Vocational High School Graphic Department.

Buck Upson and I toured the Graphic’s Department at Worcester Technical High School, http://portal.techhigh.us/Pages/default.aspx. It reminded me of when I attended vocational school. The shop handles 15,000 to 20,000 print jobs per year. What an experience! Worcester, MA, should be proud!

For Springfield, MA students to have the same experience changes must be made in the Graphics department, which I am working to improve. To do so, I need assistance from parents, union officials, school committee members, Springfield MA city officials, school department members and industry leaders. Will you help? E-mail – philip.vantassel@charter.net

Graphics-Printing Education

Is your vocational school’s graphics department teaching digital technology? I am talking about printers like HP Indigo, large format printers or rotary/digital cutters. This is one area where printing is growing and students need to be familiar with the technology. Please review the following article.

News: Labels and screenprint march toward digital as major printers buy HP – ProPrint

via News: Labels and screenprint march toward digital as major printers buy HP – ProPrint.

RIT School of Print Media-Refocus from Traditional to Digital Equipment

Rochester Institute of Technology’s School of Print Media [my Alma Mata] is removing a traditional press to increase space for digital printing. This is another indicator that digital printing is growing and another viewpoint which I believe is in-line with my Putnam blog of last year. https://printerone.wordpress.com/2011/12/05/roger-l-putnam-vocational-technical-high-school-print-shop/

Insanity: doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.
Albert Einstein

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