Printing and Purchasing

Posts tagged ‘Procurement’

Quality in Printing

Some people state we all want quality, but is that statement really accurate? How does an individual determine what is quality? If there isn’t a standard or set of project specifications can there be quality? Wikipedia states “Quality assurance, methodology of assuring conformance to specifications”. When one printed sheet or brochure is viewed by itself, it may be visually and mechanically acceptable but we can’t call it a quality printing project. To determine if a printed piece is quality we must view several printed pieces together to see how they compare to each other and to the standard or specifications [proof or original art].

As I review printing in my travels I am not seeing many quality printing projects. I don’t need the standard or proof for comparison either because I view several brochures together and they do not conform to each other. (read my blog “Print Quality”) If I am viewing non-conforming printing in the marketplace, why are print buyers accepting these projects? Why are so many in the printing industry producing non-conforming work? Is the answer because they don’t know what quality printing is? Or is it because they do not know how to produce quality?

I believe part of the reason for non-conforming printing is because some, not all, do not know the fundamentals of printing, because they were never taught. For a student to learn the fundamentals of printing, the teacher or mentor must be knowledgeable and experienced in the trade. Read our previous blog about the importance of the Job Bag a key fundamental in the trade. Individuals will practice what they have been taught, and when they have been taught the fundamentals, quality will improve.

Bleeding Edge: Setting up your print design files

If furnished art doesn’t have the necessary bleeds, the printer may choose one of the following options to compensate for the lack of bleed; e.g. enlarge the image, clone the image, or when trimming to under size the printing.

Dreaming in CMYK

Bleed is something the everyday printer finds themselves explaining on nearly a daily basis. Don’t worry – it’s not a safety issue that needs addressed. It’s a print production issue, and there’s a lot you can do to ensure your document is set up for it.

bleed-01

Bleed refers to the area of a design, including colors, images and design elements, that extend beyond the trim line of any given page. This prevents any undesirable white lines, or margins, from appearing on the edge of your page after cutting.

In the print world, it is very common for us to receive files that do not include this bleed area, but have images or design elements that run right up to the edge of the sheet. By not adding the bleed, your final product may have a small white margin that appears along the edge of the piece due to shifting while…

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Cutting a New Store Sign

Cumberland Farms pole sign trimmed on a I-Cut machine.

Demand more from energy contracts and suppliers, buyers urged | Official CIPS Magazine – Supply Management

If you purchase energy this is a good article to read. The following are good quotes from the article, “Don’t accept being treated as a standard customer if you are not.” “get them to adapt”.

Demand more from energy contracts and suppliers, buyers urged | Official CIPS Magazine – Supply Management.

How Maslow’s theory applies to sourcing

Procurement hierarchy based on Maslow’s Theory, starting with basmaslow's_hierarchy_businessballsic business needs [providing goods and services on time, with quality, and at a competitive cost], risk minimization [have backup plan so product or service isn’t disrupted when catastrophe occurs], value / stakeholder satisfaction [elimination of waste, increasing profit, minimal supplier issues], breakthrough innovations [streamline of design workflow allowing new products to market sooner], key relationships [win-win, ideal supplier relationship], based on Maslow’s Theory. Let us know your thoughts.

How Maslow’s theory applies to sourcing. [SpringTide  Consulting article on how Maslow’s theory could be applied to procurement]

Green is Good, but Bottom Line Still a Major Supply Chain Management Concern – Article from Supply Chain Management Review

“Overall, the global business-advisory firm’s survey found that while most executives recognize the importance of sustainability, cost is still a major factor and trumps environmental impact as a driver of behavior.”

Green is Good, but Bottom Line Still a Major Supply Chain Management Concern – Article from Supply Chain Management Review.

How do You See Color?

Color is everywhere we look today. Whether you are watching television, on your computer, you are outside, or reading printing, color is everywhere. Those in the printing industry know the importance of good color reproduction and the obstacles or limitations faced in that reproduction and the viewing of that reproduction.

“Color or colour (see spelling differences) is the visual perceptual property corresponding in humans to the categories called red, blue, yellow, green and others. Color derives from the spectrum of light (distribution of light power versus wavelength) interacting in the eye with the spectral sensitivities of the light receptors. Color categories and physical specifications of color are also associated with objects, materials, light sources, etc., based on their physical properties such as light absorption, reflection, or emission spectra. By defining a color space, colors can be identified numerically by their coordinates.” http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Color

Some of the obstacles or limitations faced in color reproduction or viewing are:

– Physical limitations

  • Color Blindness
    • Deuteranopia
    • Protanopia
    • Tritanopia

–  Lighting

  • Stray light
  • Glare
  • Light reflections
  • Ambient Light
  • Fluctuation in room Lighting
  • Color temperature

– Equipment or process capabilities

  • LED, LCD
    • Brightness
    • Contrast
    • Color temperature
    • Lithography, digital printers, etc.
      • Pigments

–  Substrates

  • Color
  • Surface

If there are color issues, hopefully the physical limitations of those reviewing color have been tested and reviewed. The following web links illustrate what color-challenged individuals see.

http://colorvisiontesting.com/what%20colorblind%20people%20see.htm

http://io9.com/5867406/what-do-colorblind-people-see

 

Have you taken a color test? Try one or all of the following tests to see if there are any challenges you have seeing color.

 

The Ishihara Color Test for Color Blindness

http://www.colour-blindness.com/colour-blindness-tests/ishihara-colour-test-plates/

 

FM100 Hue Test by X-Rite [Farnsworth Munsell]

http://www.xrite.com/online-color-test-challenge

 

Color Arrangement Test

http://www.colour-blindness.com/colour-blindness-tests/colour-arrangement-test/

The Daltonien Test

http://www.opticien-lentilles.com/daltonien_beta/new_test_daltonien.php

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