Printing and Purchasing

Posts tagged ‘Purchasing’

How Maslow’s theory applies to sourcing

Procurement hierarchy based on Maslow’s Theory, starting with basmaslow's_hierarchy_businessballsic business needs [providing goods and services on time, with quality, and at a competitive cost], risk minimization [have backup plan so product or service isn’t disrupted when catastrophe occurs], value / stakeholder satisfaction [elimination of waste, increasing profit, minimal supplier issues], breakthrough innovations [streamline of design workflow allowing new products to market sooner], key relationships [win-win, ideal supplier relationship], based on Maslow’s Theory. Let us know your thoughts.

How Maslow’s theory applies to sourcing. [SpringTide  Consulting article on how Maslow’s theory could be applied to procurement]

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How to Ensure all Printers Print your Color Consistently!

When multiple printers are required to produce your printing, are they all producing the same look or color? If your corporate color isn’t consistent, consider the following;

  • Content/Asset library: Maintain a single source library where all images are stored. These images have the latest corrections. This is critical since many times the client uses an image and during the proofing process requests corrections. The master content library should be updated with the corrected image, when approved.
  • Profile press: Confirm that each printer periodically is verifying/adjusting their proofs to represent what each press will reproduce.
  • Color Proofs: Review hard proofs in a viewing booth with original art. Only review soft proofs on a calibrated [daily] monitor. Before utilizing soft proofs, have each printer verify their profiled presses/hard proofs are verified on the customers soft proof monitor. When viewing soft proofs use original art when available. Concerns using soft proofs include; how will spot varnishes, coatings or other finishing operations be confirmed that they align and trap properly? How will intricate folds be verified and confirm that images align when there are no hard proofs?
  • Viewing Booth: If color is critical, confirm that the viewing booth is correct and lighting is calibrated and at the correct temperature. [It takes 10 to 20 minutes for 5000k lamps to achieve correct temperature]
  • Printers Bars: Request six [6] consecutive full press sheets from each press sign off. Confirm that the press is not slurring, doubling, and the ink density for each color is correct.
  • Original art: Available as a reference when reviewing proofs or press sheets.
  • PMS Books: Confirm age of PMS book. The older and the more a PMS book is utilized the less accurate it becomes because light will denigrate the ink/colors. The other problem with PMS books is they are manufactured and with any process there can be variation between books. If certain PMS colors are important it is best to provide ink drawdowns.
  • Ink Drawdowns: Corporate colors are associated to a PMS color, however many times when ink drawdowns are provided via the printer they need to be adjusted to match the clients color and labeled accordingly, e.g. PMS 123 ABC. To ensure all printers start with the same color, send ink drawdowns, along with wet ink samples, for the substrate being printed.
  • Stock: Have all printers printing on the same substrate. The color of the substrate can change the color being reproduced.
  • Process Builds of PMS: Consistently use the same process builds, since one project may be built using several software programs and each may build PMS colors out of process differently. Your company may also want to adjust the standard tint build to improve the color reproduction.
  • Wet Samples: When ink drawdowns are approved a small container of the ink used for the drawdown is filed for future use. Wet samples don’t deteriorate as quickly as ink drawdowns or PMS books.

If I can assist with any questions, an audit or consulting project, in regards to printing or purchasing, please contact me via e-mail at philip.vantassel@charter.net.

Green is Good, but Bottom Line Still a Major Supply Chain Management Concern – Article from Supply Chain Management Review

“Overall, the global business-advisory firm’s survey found that while most executives recognize the importance of sustainability, cost is still a major factor and trumps environmental impact as a driver of behavior.”

Green is Good, but Bottom Line Still a Major Supply Chain Management Concern – Article from Supply Chain Management Review.

Do You Care About Color?

When you see or pick up printed items, do you review their quality? Do you notice when the color is not correct or there is color variation? Quality represents the items construction, color, and reproduction consistency. When I pick up a printed item, I review the print reproduction; is the type clean or filling in, are the images in register, the construction of the piece; do crossovers align and is the color consistent for example? In fact last week I picked up a newspaper with an image out of register, a coffee cup with printed type that wasn’t clean, a catalog with crossovers that didn’t align and a flyer whose logo was the wrong color!

When checking color there are several basic items that need to be reviewed.

  • Registration: Before reviewing color confirm that the images or tints are in registration.
  • Printer Bars: Confirm the press is not slurring, doubling, and the ink density is correct.
  • Lighting: If color is critical, confirm that the viewing booth and lighting are correct and calibrated. Lighting should be 5000K [kelvins].
  • Original art: If available use as a reference when reviewing proofs or press sheets.
  • Proofs: If available use as a reference when reviewing a press sheet.
  • Memory or identifier colors: Memory color are images that everyone knows what color they are. Examples of memory colors are; the sky is blue, grass is green, and stop signs are red.
  • Corporate logos: Logos are corporate identifiers and should be reproduced consistently, otherwise the inconsistency it will take a longer time for the logo to becoming a memory color. For example a logo like Gulf Oil LLC is orange; it should never look red.
  • Skin tones: Skin tones should always look natural. A Caucasian shouldn’t appear red, like they are sun burned [unless of course that is the subject matter], or lack color like they are jaundiced.

If I can assist with any questions, an audit or consulting project, in regards to printing or purchasing, please contact me via e-mail at philip.vantassel@charter.net.

Is Your Sales Representative a Solution or a Problem?

Sales representatives have a tough job especially in the printing industry. Traditional printing is shrinking for many reasons: the economy, reduced government requirements, the internet, digital and in-office print devices to name a few. Even though there are fewer printers today than before the last economic down turn, there is still plenty of print competition. For sales representative to differentiate from the competition be a solution to the procurement.

What a SOLUTION sales representative should do;

  • ListensBuyers know their company and its needs and should listen to what they say in order to see how their company can fill that need.
  • AnswersAnswer the questions you are asked. The buyer needs to verify that your company can provide the services you would be quoting.
  • Asks – Develop insightful questions for the buyer to order gain better insight in how their company can be a solution.
  • Provides Furnish what has been requested.
  • Is conscientious – Take care of all aspects of a project.
  • Shares – Knowledge and other sources the buyer could use.
  • Has integrity – When a commitment has been made, follow through with it.
  • Serves – Has a support team that works well together, pleasant, comprehensive, knowable, and timely.

What a PROBLEM sales representative will do;

  • Argumentative They try to tell the buyer what they need instead of providing solutions.
  • Doesn’t follow through Sales representatives give unfulfilled commitments.
  • Stalks After receiving a negative answer the Sales representative will keep calling, e-mailing, or mailing too frequently.
  • Circumvents Calling others in the company instead of working with through purchasing.
  • Changes the agreed upon pricing behind the buyer’s back If there are problems, they don’t tell the buyer.
  • ChargesAdd, or inflate charges which nickel and dime clients.
  • Is dishonest Make statements which are not true, such as “I’m about done with pricing” or “I have submitted pricing” when it hasn’t been.
  • Negative – A frequently used word.
  • Doesn’t share Won’t give information requested by buyer.
  • Only “ME” StatementsYou can only get the product from me.
  • Lacks respectWalks into buyer’s office without calling and asking first.
  • Divides and conquersAfter bid has been awarded, shares lower pricing with other stakeholders.
  • Lacks integrityRequests to be included in Request for Proposal [RFP], and commits to participating through the first round of evaluation, and doesn’t.

Are your sales representatives a solution or a problem?

May I assist with any procurement or printing questions? I may be reached at philip.vantassel@charter.net

The Key Component of Any Successful Printing Project – The Job Bag

Have you ever had a printing project go wrong? If you have, maybe the project’s job bag was not read or followed, maybe the client changed the specifications after the job was started or the job bag was not completed or updated.

The Job Bag is the repository of all pertinent information concerning the printing project. A job bag may be physical, an envelope that has a printed label or form printed on the outside or electronic which can be viewed on a monitor or printed out. Every job bag has an identifying number which makes it unique from all other jobs and links the physical envelope with the electronic job bag file.

Job Bags have many components. The following are several main or key components:
• Customer information
• Delivery information
• Dates
• History
• Quantity
• Size[s]
• Substrate[s]
• Press
• Bindery
• Dummy
• Proof
• Special Information

The information provided in the job bag should provide production workers with all the necessary information to produce the customer’s project successfully. Calls or questions concerning a project are usually the result of incomplete or unclear instructions.

Recently, I was in a print shop and they were working on a print project with many components. The head of the press department provided an overview of the project. When asked to provide the job bag, however, it couldn’t be provided. When a job bag cannot be found, workers can’t review job specifics and department heads do not have the pertinent information or materials to verify production work results and provide sign-off or corrective action.

Print buyers, when touring a printing company, should look for a project’s corresponding job bag. If you have a project being worked on, ask to see a job bag, and then review it for completeness and accuracy of information. As a print buyer, if at all possible, provide all the information concerning the project when the print order is placed with the print sales representative. During my years in printing, one of the biggest issues in a printing plant is project changes that never made it to the job bag or proofs.

Fewer than half of firms use e-sourcing | Official CIPS Magazine – Supply Management

Is your company part of the 54% who don’t incorporate e-sourcing as a procurement tool and if so why?

Fewer than half of firms use e-sourcing | Official CIPS Magazine – Supply Management.

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